Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022

Preparation for Professional School

Pre-Medical Advisory Committee

Students interested in pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-optometry should consult the Pre-Medical Advisory Committee, chaired by Associate Professor Dan McCloskey, Department of Psychology, as soon as possible after enrolling in the College. The Committee will advise students about their choice of courses starting with the freshman year. A student guide for the Pre-Medical Advisory Committee letter of recommendation is available from the Office of the Dean of Health Sciences.

Pre-Chiropractic Preparation

Chiropractic schools in the United States do not require or recommend any particular undergraduate major for applicants.

Most schools suggest that they study in depth any of the liberal arts and sciences which are valuable preparation for chiropractic medicine studies. All programs in chiropractic medicine require a strong foundation in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics), effective communication skills, and a solid background in the social sciences and humanities. Some chiropractic programs have established admissions criteria and additional recommendations. It is important for students to choose appropriate courses to prepare for admission to professional schools. Since pre-chiropractic requirements vary, students should become familiar with the recommendations of the schools to which they intend to apply. The minimum pre-professional requirements for admission to a chiropractic program in the United States are: one year of English, biology with laboratories, general physics with laboratories, and general chemistry and organic chemistry with laboratories. Also recommended are at least one year of advanced mathematics, and one or more advanced courses in science. Most chiropractic schools evaluate college grades as the most important determinant of admission to a chiropractic program. Also considered are letters of recommendation, research experience, extracurricular activities, work-related experience, required essay, and personal interview.

For detailed information, consult the Pre-Medical Advisory Committee.

Pre-Dentistry Preparation

Dental schools in the United States do not require or recommend any particular field of study as an undergraduate major for applicants. Most schools suggest that they study in depth any of the liberal arts and sciences which are valuable preparation for dentistry. Some dental schools have established admissions criteria and additional recommendations. It is important for pre-dental students to choose appropriate courses to prepare for admission to dental school. Students should become familiar with the recommendations of the schools to which they intend to apply. The minimum requirements for admission to dental schools in the United States are: one year of English, biology with laboratories (may include a half-year of genetics and a half-year of botany), general physics with laboratories, and organic chemistry with laboratories. Also recommended are at least one year of advanced mathematics, and one or more advanced courses in science, sociology, and psychology.

All applicants to dental schools in the United States must participate in the Dental College Admission Testing Program and take the Dental College Admissions Test (DAT). The four examinations that comprise the testing program cover: principles of biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry; perceptual ability; reading comprehension; and quantitative reasoning. Most dental schools use the DAT scores, evaluated in conjunction with college grades, as predictors of performance in dental school. DAT scores and college transcripts are the most important determinants of admission to dental school. Also considered are letters of recommendation, extracurricular activities, work-related experience, required essay, and personal interview.

For detailed information, consult the Pre-Medical Advisory Committee.

Pre-Medicine Preparation

Medical schools in the United States do not require or recommend any particular undergraduate major for applicants. Most schools suggest that they study in depth any of the liberal arts and sciences which are valuable preparation for medical studies. All medical schools require a strong foundation in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics), effective communication skills, and a solid background in the social sciences and humanities. Some medical schools have established admissions criteria and additional recommendations. It is important for pre-medicine students to choose appropriate courses to prepare for admission to medical school. Students should become familiar with the recommendations of the schools to which they intend to apply. The minimum requirements for admission to medical schools in the United States are: one year of English, general biology with laboratories, general chemistry with laboratories, general physics with laboratories, and organic chemistry with laboratories. Also recommended are at least one year of advanced mathematics, including calculus, and one or more advanced courses in science.

All applicants to medical schools in the United States must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The four areas tested are: verbal reasoning, physical sciences, biological sciences, and writing. Most medical schools use the MCAT scores, evaluated in conjunction with college grades, as predictors of performance in medical school. MCAT scores and college transcripts are the most important determinants of admission to medical school. Also strongly considered are a letter of recommendation from the College’s pre-medical advisory committee, research experience, extracurricular activities, work-related experience, required essay, and personal interview.

In recent years, graduates of CSI have been admitted to medical schools throughout the region including: Albert Einstein, SUNY Upstate and Downstate, Harvard, Cornell, New York University, Buffalo, Baltimore, Albany, Stony Brook, and Mount Sinai.

For detailed information, consult the Pre-Medical Advisory Committee.

Pre-Optometry Preparation

The College of Staten Island has an affiliation agreement with the State University of New York College of Optometry, located in Manhattan. The foundation of this affiliation is a seven-year program that allows students to complete their baccalaureate and professional studies through three years of study at CSI followed by the four-year Optometry program at the College of Optometry. The bachelor’s degree is awarded after one year of successful study in the optometry program.

The minimum pre-optometry requirements are: one year of general biology, general physics, general chemistry, social science; one year of calculus (I & II), English composition and literature, one semester of general psychology, organic chemistry, and statistics.

In addition, a student must maintain a 3.2 grade point average, achieve a score of 320 on the Optometry Admissions Test, and have a successful personal interview.

For detailed information, consult the Pre-Medical Advisory Committee.

Pre-Law Preparation

Recommended preparation for the study of law includes study of the social sciences, the humanities, and the technological aspects of contemporary life, as well as mastery of the English language. There is no particular Pre-Law curriculum. Students should consult the faculty advisor early in the planning of their program. The Law School Admission Test, required by most law schools, should be taken early in the senior year. Associate Professor Michael Paris, Department of Political Science and Global Affairs, is the pre-law advisor.

Pre-Speech Disorders

Students interested in future careers related to Speech Disorders/Pathology should consult with the Linguistics Concentration Advisors in the English Department (Professors Jason Bishop and Christina Tortora), who will advise students about their choice of courses in this field of study.